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Pinned So what have you done to your bike today?

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by kiffsta, Nov 3, 2013.

  1. ruckusman

    ruckusman Well-Known Member Premium Member Dirty Wheel Club

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    That's one of them fancy new Zed valves mister - they cause less obstruction to the inlet fuel charge flow for MAWW POWA
     
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  2. ruckusman

    ruckusman Well-Known Member Premium Member Dirty Wheel Club

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    Out of interest - can you measure the valve spec - head diameter, stem diameter and total length
     
  3. GreyImport

    GreyImport Administrator Staff Member The Big Cheese Contributing Member

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    Uri Geller was the previous owner?
     
  4. Andych

    Andych Well-Known Member Premium Member Contributing Member

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    Well obviously the valve is made from low quality steel, I mean it didn’t even break, just bent
    I dread to think what the piston looks like


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
     
  5. Andych

    Andych Well-Known Member Premium Member Contributing Member

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    Those marks in the head will buff out... and you should be able to put the valve in the vice and straighten it out.. easy fix :)
    A quick lap job (for some reason that sounds a bit naughty) and you will be right as rain... :D

    You have to be impressed at the PO's faith in Japanese Engineering if he thought that one "might run"... or he was just palin full of Bullsh*t..

    In all seriousness though.. I would like to see what remains of the piston... plus I would be checking the rod and the crankshaft.. some serious load went through there...
     
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  6. ShaneP

    ShaneP Well-Known Member Premium Member Contributing Member

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    It looks like something was floating around in the chamber, too. The other valve looks dented and there's dents in the heads. I keep getting warned about replacing the conrod and bearings because of possible damage, but my bank account tells me to ignore them.
     
  7. Frankster

    Frankster See the World before you leave it Staff Member Premium Member Ride and Events Crew

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    Sadly, damaged piston and number 1 exhaust valve are in the bin. But from my deductive reasoning (and what was left in the chamber) I can only assume the engine dropped the exhaust valve which snapped and then number 1 inlet valve copped a whack for its troubles. I think it dropped a valve because number 2 inlet valve wasn't bent or broken.

    So, I guess that the head of the broken exhaust valve jammed between the piston and the bent (number 1) inlet valve. The barrels are in good shape. There's a small flat scratch down the side of number 4, but that was from me having to pull them off the pistons. The cams appear undamaged, but I'll have to measure them to confirm. All the shims were in the 160 to 175 range, so engine might have had a few miles on it. A couple of the valves I removed failed the wobble test, so not sure what maintenance had been done to this poor thing. I will measure valve dimensions and post soon. I've never done a valve guide replacement, so I can have a play with this head since it's beyond "that'll buff out".

    I'm wondering if these are Chinesium valves? I should have a real ZXR valve laying around somewhere, so I can measure and weigh both to compare. This engine has been apart at some stage as the pistons and the valves are very clean. No carbon build up whatsoever. Engine may have been put back together badly and that might have been the main contributor to the failure. I will have a look at the bottom end, but I'll be surprised if it's damaged. Rods are intact. I will split the cases when I get a chance. Won't spend too much time on this engine as there are plenty of other chores to do.
     
  8. ruckusman

    ruckusman Well-Known Member Premium Member Dirty Wheel Club

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    I can give you a tip on valve guide replacement

    You'll need a compressor and the equivalent of one of these http://www.supercheapauto.com.au/Product/Blackridge-Air-Hammer-4-Piece-Chisels-175mm/340369

    For removal - basically get a cap head allen bolt which goes through the guide and has thread only part way along it's length. Put a nut and washer on the thread - which are smaller than the the guide outer diameter.

    Then heat the head in the oven - for memory I went to between 150 - 200

    You won't likely get even half of one side out in each go - it cools too rapidly.

    Use the air chisel on a medium pressure ~50-60 PSI range as even the rapid tiny little strikes are amazingly effective and you don't want it bouncing out of control.

    This video is good, but I wouldn't be using as much pressure in the air hammer as he is -

    Use the pointed bit which goes into the allen key socket to stay put.

    Removal is down into the combustion chamber obviously because there's no chance of forcing anything with even the minutest amount of carbon buildup, up through the head.
    Flat surface capable of taking the heat obviously with a recess for the guide to drop into if needed.

    Installing the guides is simpler - the manual will list a guide installed height limit range - I cut and drilled an aluminium round bar slug to that necessary height.

    This time use an allen key bolt length without threads if you can find one, with a washer on top.

    Heat the head, freeze the guides
    Drive them down through the guide height slug with the air hammer till the washer stops on top of the slug, jump to the next one. I got about 6 of 8 done on each side per heat cycle.

    When I did this for a complete set of guides (XC Barina) and took it to the local cylinder head guy for seat cutting where necessary and told him the history and what was replaced - he was mightily impressed by the guide replacement technique - all credit to youtube - though I can't find the original video.
     
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  9. maelstrom

    maelstrom LiteTek Staff Member Premium Member 250cc Vendor Contributing Member

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    Car stuff! Sorry, a different world. Our little motorcycles have small delicate parts.
    The heating of the head and freezing of the guides I agree with.
    I have always used a custom made drift and a hammer. I would never use an air tool because I need to feel what is happening. If a guide does not want to budge then it will make the wrong sound and have the wrong feel. Time to stop what you are doing and make a new plan before you break a piece of the head. Motorcycle guides have a flange on the cam side and can only be removed by driving away from the combustion chamber. For fitting guides I always measure the guide and the hole to determine correct interference. In many cases it is necessary to make custom guides. Some bikes like Ducati's have oversizes available. Valve seats almost always have to be recut after guide fitting and cannot be lapped because the valve axis centre has changed.
    Often I would ream guides and fit new valves with coated stems rather than fit new guides, being a much cheaper solution.
    Cheers
     
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    Last edited: Apr 13, 2018
  10. Frankster

    Frankster See the World before you leave it Staff Member Premium Member Ride and Events Crew

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  11. Frankster

    Frankster See the World before you leave it Staff Member Premium Member Ride and Events Crew

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  12. maelstrom

    maelstrom LiteTek Staff Member Premium Member 250cc Vendor Contributing Member

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    You need something like the first one that suits your application. I have never used 'bought' tools for this work. The fit between guides, head and valve stems are all critical. Too tight and a valve can seize in the guide and you need to consider expansion rates of different valve guide material and how that matches with valve stem surface. Valve guide reamers are expensive. I would not trust anyone to fit guides, but that is just me.
     
  13. maelstrom

    maelstrom LiteTek Staff Member Premium Member 250cc Vendor Contributing Member

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    You need two drifts, one to knock them out and one to knock them in. They should be well made and designed for purpose. Kawasaki might make them.
     
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  14. risky

    risky risky

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    ordered lowering kit for vfr footpegs and street fighter handlebar conversion. hope it cures aching wrists
     
  15. sharky

    sharky Well-Known Member Premium Member Contributing Member

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    I think I bought a spares pile off the same person as @Frankster . Motor turns over but wont start lol, once I pulled it out of the corner of the shed I found the cause, easy enough to miss though, bought it all anyway. 20180227_112956.jpg 20180227_132008.jpg 20180227_120726.jpg 20180227_161116.jpg 20180227_142711.jpg
     
  16. Andych

    Andych Well-Known Member Premium Member Contributing Member

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    Hmmm reminds me of a story about Kevin Bartlett at Bathurst... his car retired in a spectacular way down Conrod (the old Conrod where they became airborne over the 3rd hump) and when Mike Raymond interviewed him and asked a typical dumb question of what happened, KB said... "Electical problem"... "it threw a rod out of the block and knocked the alternator off"
    Actually I might have the driver wrong.. it was either KB or Norm Beechy.. I think....lol
    Sounds more like KB though.
     
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  17. ruckusman

    ruckusman Well-Known Member Premium Member Dirty Wheel Club

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    You guys should chat - you may actually be able to make one good worker from two with that lot
     
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  18. Andych

    Andych Well-Known Member Premium Member Contributing Member

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    So, I got out my new “safety gear” including Black Kevlar welding sleeves so I could see about finishing all the welding, cutting and grinding on the SRX frame to turn it into a 3WP.
    Talk about frustrating, it is so time consuming making brackets with only photos for reference and then welding them on, trimming up to size etc.
    it all looks simple but it is time consuming and then there is removing unwanted brackets etc.
    All was going well and I only need to weld on 1 more bracket and a few backing nuts but..... I ran out of Argon Grrrr. Should have got a bigger bottle lol
    Anyway, more argon on Monday so it should be finished next weekend.
    Slowly getting there

    37aaf9dafc245ecd78bb2443a8403d43.jpg
    48458076d995c2b92a56d60c4962773b.jpg


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
     
  19. my67xr

    my67xr Bike Enthusiast Staff Member Premium Member Contributing Member

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    I'm thinking about switching from BOC to Bunning's for my Mig gas, BOC I pay a lot every year for an E2 size bottle rental
    Bunning's is a $200 deposit or close to it and is only a once off payment, gas is $30 dearer per bottle though
     
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  20. Andych

    Andych Well-Known Member Premium Member Contributing Member

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    Yes, I can get a D size bottle of Argon for $200 rental of the bottle plus $99 for the gas... I already own the little C size I have so I will just get it filled on Monday. It has done ok... if I am going to do more I will go to the D size.
     
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